green bar
logoheader center
spacer spacer Home > Curriculum
CLE Curriculum Search
Search results for: English
67 records found. Currently displaying page 3 of 7 [<< Prev] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 [Next >>]
Oscillations 2B Romeo and Juliet: Parallel Universe
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  Students use a simple simulation to explore "what if" questions relating to characters. They can change how characters behave to consider whether a story might have emerged differently. Note that students do not need to read the play, The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, in order to explore the simulation.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_RelationshipsB.asp
Oscillations 2C: Romeo and Juliet: In Rapturous Oscillation?
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  This simulation allows students to explore relationship dynamics through the lens of Shakespeare's characters-Romeo and Juliet. Romeo and Juliet are put into a new context in which their feelings oscillate from love on one extreme to hate on the other. Students can change settings, run the simulation, and compare results. By changing the settings, a variety of behaviors are generated.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_RelationshipsC.asp
Oscillations 3 Background Information on Simulation Created for Lesson 3: Rabbits, Rabbits and More Rabbits: Logistic Growth in Animal Populations
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  Lesson 3 is an important precursor to Lesson 4: Waves of Change: Predator and Prey Dynamics. Population dynamics are taught in a mini-series of three lessons. We recommend starting with this lesson, logistic growth, and teaching these lessons in order because they clearly show the progression of structure needed to simulate S-shaped and cyclic behavior patterns.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF
Oscillations 3A Too Many Animals?
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  Students see animals all around them, often pets in their home or birds and other wildlife in their neighborhood. This lesson allows students to explore how populations can grow and decline over time. Students can use the information in the simulation to input settings, such as how long a particular animal lives, on average. An additional option is to have students research, explore, and compare additional populations.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_PopulationA.asp
Oscillations 3B Why Are There Not More Elephants?: Population Dynamics
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  This lesson explores how animal populations can grow and decline over time through use of a simulation. This very simple model allows students to impact the birth and death rates based on input for different animals. The simulation displays what happens to the different populations over time. Students can compare the resulting trends for different animals and consider why those trends occur. Students may also research additional animal data in order to create their own runs.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_PopulationB.asp
Oscillations 4 Background Information on Simulation Created for Lesson 4: Waves of Change: Predator and Prey Dynamics
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  This lesson builds on Lesson 3 – Rabbits, Rabbits, and More Rabbits: Logistic Growth in Animal Populations within the Oscillation curriculum created for the Complex Systems Project. Lessons 3 - 5 work together to show how a population in isolation can experience growth or decline, but not oscillation (Lesson 3). Further, it is only when considering a population in relation to a wider system boundary, either interacting with another population (Lesson 4) and/or a food supply (Lesson 5), that we have the structure necessary to produce cyclic behavior.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF
Oscillations 4A Up and Down in the Wild: Predator and Prey
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  This lesson allows students to explore the interactions of two animal populations (wolves and moose) within an ecosystem. One animal in the simulation is a predator. The other animal is its prey. Their populations rise and fall (oscillate) over time as they interact and impact one another.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_PredPreyA.asp
Oscillations 4B Wild Things: Interacting Populations
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  This lessons allows students to explore the interactions of predator and prey within an ecosystem and create a map showing connections between predator and prey populations, to compare results for simulation runs.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_PredPreyB.asp
Oscillations 4C Waves of Change: Predator and Prey Dynamics
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  The predator/prey model explores a moose and wolf population living on a small island. Students can change various components of a predator/prey model, including birth factor, lifespan, and habitat area. The default simulation behavior is oscillation of both prey and predator populations, in which the state of each population impacts the state of the other over time.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: change.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_PredPreyC.asp
Oscillations 5 Background information
Author(s): Jennifer Andersen, Anne LaVigne, & in collaboration with the Creative Learning Exchange Subject: Cross-Curricular
  This 
lesson 
builds 
on 
Lesson
4 
– 
Waves 
of 
Change:
Predator‐Prey 
Dynamics
 in 
the
 Oscillation
 curriculum
 created
 for 
the 
Complex 
Systems
 Project.
 Lessons 
3
‐
5 
work
 together 
to
 show 
how 
a
 population 
in 
isolation
 can
 experience 
growth
 or
 decline, 
but 
not 
oscillation
 (Lesson
3).
 Further, 
it 
is 
only 
when 
considering
 a 
population
 in 
 relation 
to 
a 
wider 
system 
boundary, 
either
 interacting 
with 
another 
population 
(Lesson
4)
 and/or 
a 
food 
supply
 (Lesson
5),
 that
 we 
have 
the
 structure 
necessary 
to 
produce 
cyclic 
behavior.


Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF
Sorted Ascending by Title Sort descending by title Hide Descriptions

[<< Prev] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 [Next >>]
Home | Contact

The Creative Learning Exchange, 27 Central St., Acton, MA, 01720, (978) 635-9797. Comments/Questions? webmaster@clexchange.org