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Consider The Gypsy Moth: An Example of System Dynamics for Carlisle
Author(s): Debra Lyneis Subject: Implementation
  An explanation of how system dynamics would "look" and work in a curriculum, using the gypsy moth caterpillar as a concrete example of its application in a science curriculum. A simple presentation which clearly demonstrates how to start using and underst
  PDF
Friendship Game
Author(s): Peg Clemans Subject: Personal Growth and Development
  From Catalina Foothills School District. In this game, students are introduced to the concept of reinforcing relationships, as well as the idea that practicing their friendship skills could not only lead to a friendship, but could also make more friendshi
  PDF
Intro Booklet for System Dynamics in K12
Author(s): CLE Subject: Implementation
  A packet of materials designed to help those conversant with system dynamics become involved with the education of students ages 3-19. Contains brochures, resource list, and other tips and techniques from the CLE.
  PDF
Introducing System Dynamics and Systems Thinking to a School (and Children) Near You
Author(s): CLE Subject: Implementation
  A packet of materials designed to help those conversant with system dynamics become involved with the education of students ages 3-19. Contains brochures, resource list, USB drive with all CLE materials and simulations.
  PDF
Introductory Packet
Author(s): CLE Subject: Why K12 SD
  A packet of six articles to introduce system dynamics in education. Includes: a) System Dynamics And Learner-Centered-Learning In Kindergarten Through 12th Grade Education. (Jay W. Forrester) An argument for the necessity of change in the educational process and the applicability of system dynamics in K-12 education. By the founder of the discipline of system dynamics. b) Systems Thinking, Four Key Questions. (Barry Richmond) A general over-view. Interesting paper to read to get the perspective of a professional system dynamicist, c) Bring System Dynamics to a School near You ( Debra Lyneis.) An explanation of the methods people have used to bring system dynamics and learner-centered learning to schools across the US.d) Consider The Gypsy Moth: An Example of System Dynamics for Carlisle. (Debra Lyneis) An explanation of how system dynamics would "look" and work in a curriculum, using the gypsy moth caterpillar as a concrete example of its application in a science curriculum. A simple presentation which clearly demonstrates how to start using and understanding basic system dynamics and modeling. e) Infusing System Dynamics into Kindergarten through Eighth Grade Curriculum (Debra Lyneis) A guide to help infuse the system dynamics concepts into curriculum. f) System Dynamics in 25 Words or Less (Debra Lyneis) A short, succinct description of system dynamics.
  Zipped (Models & PDF)
Oscillations 1 Background Information on Simulation Created for Lesson 1: Springs Everywhere: Exploring Spring-Mass Dynamics
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  This lesson is a precursor to the Oscillation curriculum created for the Complex Systems Project. Experimenting with a virtual spring will help students gain an intuitive understanding for why a spring oscillates. This knowledge will be reinforced in other lessons in this series.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF
Oscillations 1A: Fun with Springs
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Anderson, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  Students explore a simple spring simulation is see how springs behave, given different characteristics. Students can change the springiness, the resistance, and the amount of push or pull.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_SpringA.asp
Oscillations 1B Exploring Springs: A Little Bounce in the World
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  Students explore a simple spring simulation to see how springs behave, given different characteristics. Students can change the springiness, the resistance, a mass at the end of the spring, and the amount of push or pull.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_SpringB.asp
Oscillations 1C Springs Everywhere: Exploring Spring-Mass Dynamics
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  The spring simulation allows students to experiment with a virtual spring-mass system. They can change settings, run the simulation, and compare results. The default simulation behavior is equilibrium, as the spring is initially at rest. By changing the settings, a variety of oscillatory behaviors are generated. This model is intended as an introduction for this series of oscillatory models, although it also aligns with specific math and science curricular standards.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_SpringC.asp
Oscillations 2 Background Information on Simulation Created for Lesson 2: Romeo and Juliet: In Rapturous Oscillation?
Author(s): Jennifer Andersen, Anne LaVigne, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  The model used in this lesson is structurally similar to the spring-mass simulation (Lesson 1) and is intended to follow it. It challenges students to apply what they have learned about springs to intangible subject matter. For example, “resistance” from the spring simulation gets recast as “fatigue” to show what happens when one party in a relationship gets tired of the up-and-down dynamic. Students should recognize that their own personal relationships include themselves as part of the system; therefore, they do have the opportunity to influence an unwanted dynamic.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF
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