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Search results for: Separate Cause and Effect
26 records found. Currently displaying page 1 of 3 1 2 3 [Next >>]
Thinking about Drinking: What are the Effects of Drinking Alcohol
Author(s): Jeff Potash Subject: Cross-Curricular
  The purpose of this simulation is to increase awareness of potential effects of alcohol on the body over a 12-hour period. The simulation provides students and adults an opportunity to see what happens over time after the consumption of alcohol.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/simulations/alcohol_simulation.asp
The Systems Thinking Playbook Exercise 21: Frames
Author(s): Linda Booth Sweeney, & Dennis Meadows Subject: Cross-Curricular
  Participants experience different boundaries in a system.

Complex Systems Connection: Separate Cause and Effect. Participants experience the difference between and the extent of time and space boundaries of systems, which is an underlying aspect of all systems, both simple and complex. Available from Chelsea Green Publishers.
  More about the book at: http://www.chelseagreen.com/bookstore/item/the_systems_thinking_playbook:hardcover%20with%20dvd
Studying The Lorax with Feedback Loops
Author(s): Rob Quaden, & Alan Ticotsky Subject: Cross-Curricular
  Students read "The Lorax," by Dr. Suess, and then develop a connection circle and causal loops to understand and illustrate the themes of the story.

Complex Systems Connection: Separate Cause and Effect, Short and Long Term Conflicts. Short-term focus on making money results in depletion of resource and environmental degradation over time and the collapse of the business. Actions and their detrimental consequences are separated by time.
  PDF
Smallpox Crisis Management Simulation
Author(s): Ron Zaraza Subject: Cross-Curricular
  Twenty-three students from three Portland area high schools accepted an invitation to serve as part of the CMT for an unspecified disaster simulation. In 30 hours at Wilson High School, they went from the introduction of the problem to a fully developed and model-tested plan for dealing with a smallpox outbreak, reducing deaths from a possible 750,000+ to fewer than 250. They developed a control plan that used the same strategies the World Health Organization developed over a ten-year period for dealing with smallpox outbreaks.

Complex Systems Connection: Separate Cause and Effect. For some illness/disease, symptoms appear long after initial infection. Sometimes people travel great distance while infected because they are unaware of the infection. Medical "detectives" faced with an epidemic must understand how the infection spreads and how quickly. Delays in the system make this more difficult.
  Zipped (Models & PDF)
Shape of Change (Lesson 8): The Rainforest Game, including Stocks and Flows
Author(s): Rob Quaden, Alan Ticotsky, & Debra Lyneis Subject: Cross-Curricular
  From "The Shape of Change." In this simulation game, students act out the lives of trees, following different planting and harvesting policies. Students may be surprised to learn that, while the game seems very active, the stock/flow map of the game is quite basic.

Complex Systems Connection: Short and Long Term Conflicts, Separate Cause and Effect. People sometimes decide to use natural resources to meet present goals (satisfy customers, increase profits) and ignore long-term consequences. Delays in a system involving renewable resources can make it difficult to understand how present decisions to use the resource will affect long-term sustainability.
  PDF
Shape of Change (Lesson 5): The Infection Game, including Stocks and Flows
Author(s): Rob Quaden, Alan Ticotsky, & Debra Lyneis Subject: Cross-Curricular
  From "The Shape of Change." Students play a game that simulates the spread of an epidemic. The included Infection Game stock/flow map combines all the elements that were used in the previous lessons. Students apply all that they have learned about behavior over time graphs, stocks and flows, and reinforcing and balancing feedback loops to understand how and why the infection spread among them.

Complex Systems Connection: Separate Cause and Effect. For some illness/disease, symptoms appear long after initial infection. Sometimes people travel great distance while infected because they are unaware of the infection. Medical "detectives" faced with an epidemic must understand how the infection spreads and how quickly. Delays in the system make this more difficult.
  PDF
Shape of Change (Lesson 11): Keystone Species in an Ecosystem--Using Connnection Circles to Tell the Story, including Stocks and Flows
Author(s): Rob Quaden, Alan Ticotsky, & Debra Lyneis Subject: Cross-Curricular
  From "The Shape of Change." Students read a chapter from a skillfully written science book and use connection circles to unravel a mystery of nature. In the Stocks and Flows lesson, students will build the stock/flow map from the ground up.

Complex Systems Connection: Separate Cause and Effect, Short and Long Term Conflicts. This lesson illustrates how scientists often see effects or results of actions that set consequences in motion many years prior. They must link the effects back to the root cause or causes of the problem. Part of the backstory for this lesson illustrates that hunters aiming for profit in the short term can destroy the resource so it's not available in the long term.
  PDF
Shape of Change (Lesson 10): Do You Want Fries With That? Learning about Connection Circles, including Stocks and Flows
Author(s): Rob Quaden, Alan Ticotsky, & Debra Lyneis Subject: Cross-Curricular
  From "The Shape of Change." In this lesson, students use connection circles to examine an article about the health risks associated with rising French fry consumption. As in previous lessons, they identify what is changing and describe how it is changing, but in this lesson they begin to think about why it is changing, as they create feedback loops.

Complex Systems Connection: Separate Cause and Effect, Short and Long Term Conflicts. Eating an unhealthy diet may not seem to hurt a person immediately, but it can have long-term negative impacts on overall health. Because we may not feel the effects right away, it can be easy to continue the bad behavior. People eat unhealthy food because it tastes good; it gives them immediate pleasure. Over the long run, however, the effects accumulate, leading to poor overall health.
  PDF
Population Dynamics, Part D: Connecting Past, Present and Future, Part D:America's Baby Boom and Global Youth Bulges
Author(s): Jeffrey Potash, & Jennifer Andersen Subject: Cross-Curricular
  The Population Dynamics series are designed to supplement existing high school history curricula and be largely self-directed by students outside of class time. The lessons are intended to introduce students to a variety of systems tools (behavior-over-time graphs, stock/flow maps, models/simulations) alongside primary and secondary historical resources. Part D focuses on America's baby boom and global youth bulges.

Complex Systems Connection: Separate Cause and Effect. Baby booms and youth bulges play out over time. The impacts of population dynamics may cause changes to the environment and social systems that will be felt over several generations. It is difficult to predict the effects of issues that are decades away, and even harder to implement policies that will correct for them. Baby booms and youth bulges can create push factors that cause particular age groups to migrate to new countries. Young or old, people respond to shrinking opportunities by looking outside national borders. One country's youth bulge may become another region's immigration influx. Cause within System. The decision to have a child is very personal, but common factors are often present (age, finances). These factors also affect the rate at which people die, leave (emigrate) or come to a new area (immigrate). This demographic system generates its own behavior. The particular trajectory of population growth or decline is a consequence of these various flows of people. Shifting Burden. Humanitarian aid is widely provided to nations in need. When aid creates a dependence between the giver and receiver, the ability of the receiving country to meet its own needs may be compromised. Over time the "burden" of providing for a country's citizens may be transferred to the intervener - the country or countries providing the aid.
  Link to the file: http://clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/populationdynamics/popdynD.asp
Population Dynamics, Part C: Connecting Past, Present and Future, Part C: U.S. Urbanization from 1820 to 1920
Author(s): Jeffrey Potash, & Jennifer Andersen Subject: Cross-Curricular
  The Population Dynamics series are designed to supplement existing high school history curricula and be largely self-directed by students outside of class time. The lessons are intended to introduce students to a variety of systems tools (behavior-over-time graphs, stock/flow maps, models/simulations) alongside primary and secondary historical resources. Part C focuses on U.S. urbanization between 1820 to 1920.

Complex Systems Connection: Separate Cause and Effect. The process of urbanization unfolds over decades, sometimes centuries. Small changes in society (inventions of labor-saving devices for farming) accumulate over time and cause other changes (people move to cities to find jobs). The trend can be imperceptible over a few years but becomes apparent when looking at a long timescale. Urbanization features push and pull forces that transform entire nations. Changing population dynamics, environments and social systems push some people to seek opportunities elsewhere. The result can be explosive urban growth that creates a pull for others. Short and Long Term Conflicts. Achieving an immediate goal (welcoming new labor, improving labor productivity) can come at long-term costs (lower wages for all, fewer jobs). Complex systems often feature such tradeoffs - seemingly rational decisions and actions in the present can have unintended consequences in the future.
  Link to the file: http://clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/populationdynamics/popdynC.asp
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