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Oscillations 7 Background Information
Author(s): Jennifer Andersen, Anne LaVigne, & in collaboration with the Creative Learning Exchange Subject: Cross-Curricular
  Commodities are a class of goods that can be produced in such a way that it is difficult or impossible to distinguish one instance of the commodity from another. The price of the commodity is determined as a function of the market as a whole, not in regard to who produced it or how it was produced. Commodities share a common problem in that prices and production exhibit repeating cycles. This simulation introduces students to the concept of commodity cycles by comparing two types of hog farms: • Large; over 2000 hogs produced per year and primarily serving the price-conscience consumer • Small; fewer than 2000 hogs per year and primarily serving the quality-conscience consumer.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
 
Oscillations 6C: The Big Squeeze: Pressure, Achievement and Burnout
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the Creative Learning Exchange Subject: Cross-Curricular
  This model illustrates a workaholic situation where pressure is entirely internally generated through increasing one’s own expectations for oneself. Overachievers can understand how setting the bar ever higher can be unhealthy behavior over the long-term even though they have been successful with this strategy so far in life.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_BurnoutC.asp
Oscillations 6B Running in Circles: How Fast Can We Go?
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the Creative Learning Exchange Subject: Cross-Curricular
  This lesson explores individual choices and work styles and how some of those choices may lead to cycles of burnout. Students take on the role of "advisor" to friends who are experiencing these cycles and also reflect on their own personal life choices.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_BurnoutB.asp
Oscillations 6 Background Information
Author(s): Jennifer Andersen, Anne LaVigne, & in collaboration with the Creative Learning Exchange Subject: Cross-Curricular
  Burnout is a condition characterized by apathy and low energy. It is a severe reaction to stress. A typical candidate for burnout is a high-achiever, someone who is his/her own worst enemy and constantly puts pressure on himself/herself to excel in all areas of their lives. This simulation offers one hypothesis for how a typical overachiever may repeatedly drive himself/herself into periods of low activity and achievement by depleting his or her energy reserves. While the screen images, role-playing description and parameter settings presented in this document refer to the C-level simulation, most of the information is relevant to the B-level simulation as well.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF
Oscillations 5C Eat and Be Eaten: Predator as Prey, Prey as Predator
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the Creative Learning Exchange Subject: Cross-Curricular
  The model for Lesson 5 explores a moose and wolf population. Students take on the role of wildlife manager and control hunting policies for both predator and prey populations.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_BiomassC.asp
Oscillations 5B Circles of interaction: Predator, Prey, and Plants
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the Creative Learning Exchange Subject: Cross-Curricular
  This lesson explores predator, prey, and plants within an ecosystem. Students role-play being a wildlife manager who is doing on-the-job training.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_BiomassB.asp
Oscillations 5A All Together Now: Predator, Prey, and Plants
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  This lesson allows students to explore the interactions of two animal populations (wolves and moose) and plants within an ecosystem. The populations and the plants rise and fall (oscillate) over time as they interact and impact one another.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_BiomassA.asp
Oscillations 5 Background information
Author(s): Jennifer Andersen, Anne LaVigne, & in collaboration with the Creative Learning Exchange Subject: Cross-Curricular
  This 
lesson 
builds 
on 
Lesson
4 
– 
Waves 
of 
Change:
Predator‐Prey 
Dynamics
 in 
the
 Oscillation
 curriculum
 created
 for 
the 
Complex 
Systems
 Project.
 Lessons 
3
‐
5 
work
 together 
to
 show 
how 
a
 population 
in 
isolation
 can
 experience 
growth
 or
 decline, 
but 
not 
oscillation
 (Lesson
3).
 Further, 
it 
is 
only 
when 
considering
 a 
population
 in 
 relation 
to 
a 
wider 
system 
boundary, 
either
 interacting 
with 
another 
population 
(Lesson
4)
 and/or 
a 
food 
supply
 (Lesson
5),
 that
 we 
have 
the
 structure 
necessary 
to 
produce 
cyclic 
behavior.


Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF
Oscillations 4C Waves of Change: Predator and Prey Dynamics
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  The predator/prey model explores a moose and wolf population living on a small island. Students can change various components of a predator/prey model, including birth factor, lifespan, and habitat area. The default simulation behavior is oscillation of both prey and predator populations, in which the state of each population impacts the state of the other over time.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: change.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_PredPreyC.asp
Oscillations 4B Wild Things: Interacting Populations
Author(s): Anne LaVigne, Jennifer Andersen, & in collaboration with the CLE Subject: Cross-Curricular
  This lessons allows students to explore the interactions of predator and prey within an ecosystem and create a map showing connections between predator and prey populations, to compare results for simulation runs.

Complex Systems Connection: Cause within System. Five interdisciplinary areas are covered in a series of lessons, utilizing a family of models that all generate oscillation. Oscillation in real-world systems is often considered problematic rather than a consequence of system structure. This progression of lessons will help students understand that undesirable behavior can be a consequence of system structure and not a result of outside, uncontrollable influences. In other words, a system that oscillates does so because it has an inherent tendency to do so.
  PDF

Link to the simulation: http://www.clexchange.org/curriculum/complexsystems/oscillation/Oscillation_PredPreyB.asp
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